Annual Report on the Privacy Act 2013-2014

Table of Contents

Introduction

The Privacy Act (Act) came into force on July 1, 1983. The purpose of the Act is to protect the privacy of individuals with respect to personal information about themselves held by government institutions and to provide individuals with a right of access to that information.

The Public Prosecution Services of Canada (PPSC) became subject to the Act when it was established as an independent organization on December 12, 2006, with the coming into force of the Director of Public Prosecutions Act (Part 3 of the Federal Accountability Act).

In accordance with section 72 of the Act, the PPSC has prepared the 2013–2014 Annual Report on the Administration of the Act for tabling before both the House of Commons and Senate. The Report provides an interpretation of the information contained in the PPSC’s Statistical Report on the Administration of the Act. In addition, it reports on emerging trends, training activities and newly implemented or revised internal policies, guidelines and procedures.

Mandate of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada

The mandate of the PPSC is set out in the Director of Public Prosecutions Act. The Act empowers the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) to:

For the purpose of carrying out these statutory responsibilities, the DPP is the Deputy Attorney General of Canada.

The Director of Public Prosecutions Act also empowers the DPP to:

The DPP has the rank and status of a deputy head of a department, and in this capacity is responsible for the management of the PPSC as a distinct governmental organization.

With the exception of Canada Elections Act matters, the Attorney General of Canada can issue a directive to the DPP on a prosecution or assume conduct of a prosecution, but must do so in writing and a corresponding notice must be published in the Canada Gazette. In turn, the DPP must inform the Attorney General of any prosecution or planned intervention that may raise important questions of general interest. Similarly, the Attorney General can assign additional responsibilities to the DPP, provided the assignment is in writing and published in the Canada Gazette.

Roles and Responsibilities of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada

The PPSC prosecutes offences under federal statutes following an investigation by a law enforcement agency. The PPSC is not an investigative agency and does not conduct investigations. The separation of law enforcement from the prosecution function is a well-established principle of the Canadian criminal justice system. However, cooperation between investigators and prosecutors is essential, particularly in the context of large and complex cases. Certain investigative tools, such as an application for a wiretap authorization, are only obtained on application to the court by a prosecutor. As a result, the PPSC often provides legal advice and assistance to law enforcement officials at the investigative stage.

In all provinces and territories except Quebec and New Brunswick, the PPSC is responsible for prosecuting all drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, regardless of which police agency investigates the alleged offences. In Quebec and New Brunswick, the PPSC prosecutes only drug offences investigated by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

In all provinces and territories, the PPSC prosecutes charges under federal statutes such as the Income Tax Act, the Fisheries Act, the Excise Act, the Customs Act, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Canada Shipping Act, and the Competition Act, as well as conspiracies and attempts to violate these statutes. In total, over 250 federal statutes contain offences that fall under the PPSC’s jurisdiction to prosecute, and the PPSC regularly prosecutes offences under approximately 40 of those statutes.

The PPSC is responsible for prosecuting all Criminal Code offences in the territories. In the provinces, the PPSC has jurisdiction to prosecute a limited number of Criminal Code offences, including those related to terrorism, criminal organizations, money laundering, proceeds of crime, and fraud. Under arrangements with the provinces, the PPSC may also prosecute Criminal Code offences that are otherwise within a provincial jurisdiction when the accused also faces charges within federal jurisdiction.

Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office

The ATIP Office holds primary responsibility for the implementation and administration of the Privacy Act. In collaboration with the Offices of Primary Interest (OPIs), the ATIP Office serves as the center of expertise in relation to the administration of the Act within the PPSC and is responsible for:

Roles and Responsibilities under the Privacy Act

The following chart provides a diagram of the ATIP Office and the reporting relationships within the PPSC. It should be read in conjunction with the descriptions below which outline the roles and responsibilities of the employees, in ensuring that the PPSC meets its obligations under the Act.

Organizational Chart of Access to Information and Privacy Governance Structure 
[Text version]

Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP)

As the designated “head of institution”, the DPP has the overall responsibility to ensure that the PPSC complies with the requirements of the Act, its Regulations and the TBS’s policies, directives and guidelines.

ATIP Office Personnel

ATIP Coordinator:
The Executive Director and Senior Counsel, Ministerial and External Relations Secretariat, by delegated authority issued by the DPP under the Act, serves as the PPSC’s ATIP Coordinator and is responsible for the oversight of the application of the Act, its Regulations and the TBS’s policies, directives and guidelines.
ATIP Manager:
The ATIP Manager has direct responsibility for the daily management of the ATIP Office and is responsible for coordinating all activities relating to the operation of the privacy legislation. This includes managing and supervising staff, developing and implementing privacy policies and procedures, conducting in-house training, and reviewing PPSC policies, procedures and agreements to ensure that they comply with the Act, the Regulations and the TBS’s policies, directives and guidelines.
ATIP Advisors:
ATIP Advisors are responsible for processing complex and sensitive requests for personal information, responding to consultations from other federal institutions or other levels of government, conducting in-house training and negotiating the resolution of complaints with investigators from the OPC. They also act as liaison between the applicant and the Points of Contact in PPSC Regional Offices and Headquarters. In addition, ATIP Advisors provide assistance to the ATIP Manager in updating the Info Source Chapter and preparing the statistical and annual reports on the administration of the Act.
Junior ATIP Analyst:
The Junior ATIP Analyst carries out the administrative duties of the ATIP Office, processes low-complexity requests for personal information and responds to low-complexity consultations from other federal institutions or other levels of government. The Junior ATIP Analyst also acts as liaison between the applicant and the Points of Contact in PPSC Regional Offices and Headquarters and provides assistance to the ATIP Advisors and the ATIP Manager in the processing of requests for personal information as required.
ATIP Counsel:
Counsel to the PPSC’s Ministerial and External Relations Secretariat also serves as the ATIP Counsel and is responsible for providing legal advice on the application and interpretation of the Act, the TBS’s policies, guidelines and procedures, and the relevant case law to the ATIP Coordinator, the ATIP Office and PPSC managers.

Headquarters and Regional Offices

While the ATIP Office is the focal point for the administration of the privacy legislation, managers and employees at Headquarters and in Regional Offices also play a key role in ensuring that the PPSC fulfills its obligations under the Act.

Deputy Directors of Public Prosecutions:
The Deputy Directors of Public Prosecutions are responsible for assisting the DPP in ensuring that the PPSC complies with the requirements of the Act, its Regulations and related TBS policies, directives and guidelines.
Headquarter Directors and Chief Federal Prosecutors:
Headquarter Directors and Chief Federal Prosecutors are the points of contact of the ATIP Office and are responsible for ensuring that requests for personal information that pertain to their area of responsibility are handled promptly and efficiently. They are also responsible for ensuring that their respective Office or Region operates within the requirements of the Act, its Regulations, and related TBS and PPSC policies, directives and guidelines, and that their employees and agents are instructed on privacy-related matters as appropriate.
Managers, Team Leaders, Supervisors and Agent Supervisors:
Managers, Team Leaders, Supervisors and Agent Supervisors, whether at National Headquarters or in Regional Offices, are responsible for coordinating the retrieval of records requested under the Act and advising the ATIP Office of issues that could arise from disclosure. They must also provide assistance and privacy-related instructions to their staff members as required. In addition, Managers, Team Leaders, Supervisors and Agent Supervisors must ensure that their respective programs operate within the requirements of the Act, its Regulations, and related TBS and PPSC policies, directives and guidelines.
Employees and Agents:
Employees and Agents must carry out their duties in a manner that is compliant with the Act, its Regulations, and related TBS and PPSC policies, directives and guidelines, including ensuring that any records they create are properly managed and easily retrievable.

Delegated Authorities

Under section 73 of the Act, the head of a government institution may, by order, designate one or more officers or employees of that institution to exercise or perform any of the powers, duties of function of the head of the institution under the Act.

The Executive Director and Senior Counsel, Ministerial and External Relations Secretariat and the ATIP Manager have both been granted full authority to exercise the powers and to perform the duties and functions of the DPP under the Act (see Delegation Order in Appendix A). The ATIP Manager exercises this authority in the absence of the ATIP Coordinator.

Interpretation of the Statistical Report

The following section provides an interpretation of the Statistical Report on the Privacy Act located in Appendix B of this report. It also compares statistical data from 2013–2014 with data from previous reporting periods in order to identify possible trends.

Part 1 – Requests under the Privacy Act

Number of requests

The PPSC received 21 formal requests for personal information in 2013–2014, which represents an increase of 31% in the number of requests from the previous reporting period. Three (3) requests were carried forward from fiscal year 2012–2013.

The following diagram displays the number of requests for personal information that were received by the PPSC since the 2006–2007 reporting period.

Number of requests for personal information that were received by the PPSC since the 2006–2007 reporting period
2006-2007 (1) 2007-2008 (9) 2008-2009 (7) 2009-2010 (17) 2010-2011 (8) 2011-2012 (13) 2012-2013 (16) 2013-2014 (21)
1 9 7 17 8 13 16 21

* Data from fiscal year 2006–2007 represents only the last quarter of that reporting period.

Although the number of requests fluctuated in the early years following the creation of the PPSC, it has been steadily increasing since the 2010–2011 reporting period, reaching an all-time high of 21 in this reporting period.

Part 2 – Requests closed during the reporting period

Disposition of requests

The PPSC responded to 21 requests for personal information during 2013–2014. A total of 3,445 pages were reviewed in response to these requests, which represents a 76% decrease in volume from the previous reporting period. Three (3) outstanding requests for personal information were carried over to the next reporting period.

The dramatic decrease in page volume can be attributed to the fact that the PPSC finalized a 13,000 page privacy request in 2012–2013. Although the processing of this request occurred over two (2) reporting periods, the PPSC was required to report the total page count in the fiscal year in which the request was completed (i.e. 2012–2013).

The completed requests were categorized as follows:

Percentage of the Disposition of Requests
All disclosed (1) Disclosed in part (9) No records exist (6) Requests abandoned (5)
5% 43% 28% 24%

Requests where access could not be provided fell into the following categories:

No Records Exist

A total of 28% of requests could not be processed as no relevant records existed under the control of the PPSC. Where possible, applicants were advised of government institutions that may have records and how to contact those institutions to submit a request.

Request abandoned

Another 24% of requests were abandoned by the applicants. In most cases, applicants were asked for clarification before material could be gathered. Since no clarification was provided, their requests were deemed abandoned.

The PPSC’s disclosure rates in 2013–2014 are consistent with the five (5) year average. From reporting periods 2009–2010 to 2013–2014, the PPSC responded to 73 requests for personal information. Full or partial disclosure of the information requested was provided in 56% of cases. An additional 23% cases could not be processed as no relevant records existed under the control of the PPSC. The remaining 21% of requests were abandoned by the applicant.

Completion time

The chart below displays the time required to process requests for personal information during the 2013–2014 reporting period.

Percentage of requests by completion time
30 days or less (12) 31 to 60 days (6) 61 to 120 days (3)
57% 29% 14%

Of the 21 requests that were completed during fiscal year 2013–2014, 12 were processed within the 30-day statutory response period. Six (6) requests were responded to within 31 to 60 days, while three (3) requests required between 61 to 120 days to complete.

Over the last five (5) reporting periods, the majority of the PPSC’s requests for personal information were responded to within the 30-days statutory deadline. A review of the data collected in fiscal years 2009–2010 to 2013–2014 revealed that that 33% of all requests completed during that time period were processed in 15 days or less. An additional 25% of requests were processed within 16 to 30 days.

Exemptions

An individual’s right of access to his or her personal information is subject to limited and specific exceptions. Limitations to the right of access are set out in sections 18 through 28 of the Act.

The following chart illustrates the exemptions that were invoked by the PPSC during the 2013–2014 reporting period.

Exemptions that were invoked by the PPSC during the 2013-2014 reporting period
Section 26 Section 27
9 4

Exclusions

Records or parts thereof to which the Act does not apply are said to be “excluded”. Pursuant to section 69, the Act does not apply to published material or material available for purchase by the public, library or museum material preserved solely for public record, and material placed in Library and Archives Canada. Records containing Confidences of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada that have been in existence for less than 20 years are also excluded from the Act pursuant to section 70.

During the 2013–2014 reporting period, no exclusions pursuant to sections 69 and 70 of the Act were applied by the PPSC.

Format of information released

For requests where information was disclosed, responses were provided electronically either by e-mail or on a compact disk in 50% cases. Paper copies of records were provided in the other 50% of cases.

Complexity

The mandate of the PPSC is to prosecute offences under federal jurisdiction and to provide advice on prosecution-related matters to investigative agencies. Due to the nature of the organization’s work, processing access to information requests at the PPSC is challenging. Records often contain information relating to criminal or regulatory investigations or prosecutions and to the PPSC's work involving other organizations and departments at the federal, provincial or territorial level.

During the 2013–2014 reporting period, the PPSC consulted with other government institutions on five (5) particularly complex requests.

Deemed refusals

The PPSC was in deemed refusal on three (3) occasions during the 2013–2014 reporting period. On one (1) occasion, the PPSC took a 30-day extension. However, due to the large volume of records sought, the organization was unable to complete the processing of the request within 60 days.

The PPSC’s was unable to respond to two other (2) requests within the 30-day statutory time limit due to the staff turnover that occurred in the ATIP Office.

Requests for translation

There were no requests for translation from one official language to the other.

Part 3 – Disclosures under subsection 8(2)

Subsection 8(2) of the Act describes the circumstances under which personal information under the control of a government institution may be disclosed without the consent of the individual to whom the information pertains.

There were no disclosures made to federal investigative bodies for the purpose of enforcing any law of Canada or a province, or for carrying out a lawful investigation [paragraph 8(2)(e)] in fiscal year 2013–2014, nor were any disclosures made in the public interest [paragraph 8(2)(m)].

Part 4 – Requests for correction of personal information and notations

Paragraph 12(2)(a) of the Act provides that every individual who is given access to personal information about themselves that has been used, is being used or is available for use for an administrative purpose (i.e. in a decision making process that directly affects the individual) is entitled to request correction of the information where the individual believes there is an error or omission.

There were no requests for correction of personal information nor were notations required during this reporting period.

Part 5 – Extensions

Paragraph 15(a) of the Act allows for an extension of the 30-day statutory time limit for a maximum of 30 days in cases where meeting the original time limit would unreasonably interfere with the operations of the institution processing the request, or when consultations with other government institutions are necessary and cannot reasonably be completed within the original time limit.

Reason for and length of extensions

Five (5) extensions of 30 days each were taken during the 2013–2014 reporting period. In all instances, the extension was sought on the basis that meeting the original time limit would have unreasonably interfered with the operations of the PPSC.

Part 6 – Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

Number of consultations

The PPSC received 13 privacy consultations in 2013–2014, one (1) more than during the previous reporting period. One (1) consultation was also carried forward from fiscal year 2012–2013.

Source of consultations

Percentage of consultations by other government institutions
RCMP (8) CRA (3) DoJ (2)
62% 23% 15%

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) forwarded the highest number of consultations with eight (8), followed by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) which sent five (3) consultations. Two (2) consultations were received from the Justice Canada (DoJ).

Recommendations

The PPSC responded to 14 consultations during the 2013–2014 reporting period. A total of 323 pages were reviewed, representing a 45% decrease in volume from the previous reporting period.

The completed consultations are categorized as follows:

Percentage of the completed consultations
Disclosed entrirely (1) Disclosed in part (11) Consult other institution (2)
7% 79% 14%

The PPSC’s disclosure rates in 2013–2014 remain consistent with the five (5) year average. The PPSC responded to 77 consultations from fiscal years 2009–2010 to 2013–2014. The organization responded by releasing information in whole or in part in 86% of cases. In only 1% of cases was the information requested exempted in its entirety. The PPSC recommended that another institution be consulted in the remaining 13% of cases.

Completion time

The chart below displays the time required to complete the processing of consultation requests during the 2013–2014 reporting period.

Percentage of requests by completion time
1 to 15 days (10) 16 to 30 days (1) 31 to 60 days (2) 181 to 165 days (1)
72% 7% 14% 7%

Of the 14 consultations that were completed in 2013–2014, 11 were processed within 30 days or less. Two (2) consultations were responded to within 31 to 60 days, while one (1) consultation required between 181 to 365 days to complete.

Over the last five (5) reporting periods, nearly three quarters of the privacy consultations received by the PPSC were responded to within 30 days. A review of the data collected from fiscal years 2009–2010 to 2013–2014 revealed that 64% of consultations completed during that time period were processed in 15 days or less. An additional 17% were completed within 16 to 30 days.

Part 7 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

No consultations containing Cabinet confidences were carried out by the PPSC during the 2013–2014 reporting period.

Part 8 – Resources related to the Privacy Act

Costs

The PPSC spent a total of $160,311 administering the Act of which salaries accounted for $144,720 and Goods and Services accounted for $15,591. There were no overtime expenditures during this reporting period.

It is important to note that, for reporting purposes, the overall budget for the ATIP Office is divided between the administration of both the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. As the administration of the Access to Information Act has taken up more of the ATIP Office’s time during the 2013–2014 reporting period, more of its resource dollars are accounted for under that Act.

Training Activities

As the ATIP Office experienced staff turnover during 2013–2014, few privacy-related training sessions were provided to PPSC employees during this reporting period.

An internal discussion forum on how security and privacy impacts the PPSC’s business was conducted with Security Services and the Information Management and Technology Directorate. A total of 30 employees from PPSC Headquarters and Regional Offices participated.

ATIP personnel also provided informal training to employees on various privacy-related matters throughout the year on an ad hoc basis.

New or Revised Policies, Guidelines and Procedures

In 2013–2014, the PPSC created internal procedures for processing requests under the Act. The procedures provide guidance to employees and agents of the PPSC who are required to assist the organization in fulfilling its legal obligations under the Act.

Complaints and Investigations

Decisions made under the Act are subject to a two-tiered system of review. The first level of review consists of a formal complaint to the Privacy Commissioner of Canada; the second is an application for judicial review to the Federal Court.

One (1) complaint was filed with the OPC against the PPSC during the 2013–2014 reporting period. The complainant is alleging that the PPSC has failed to provide all of the information requested. One (1) complaint was also carried forward from the previous reporting period. The OPC has yet to issue its finding in either case.

Federal Court Review

During this reporting period, no application for judicial review was filed with the Federal Court pursuant to section 44 of the Act.

Monitoring of Processing Time

The ATIP Office has established and maintains a comprehensive statistical reporting and performance measurement system. Monthly reports are provided to the ATIP Coordinator identifying the number of active privacy requests, the sources and due dates of the requests, as well as the length of any extensions taken.

Information relating to the processing time of requests for correction of personal information is included in the monthly reports.

Privacy Breaches

A material privacy breach involves improper or unauthorized collection, use, disclosure, retention or disposal of sensitive personal information which could reasonably be expected to cause serious injury or harm to the individual to whom it relates.

One (1) material breach was reported to the OPC during the 2013–2014 reporting period. A compact disk (CD) containing the Crown’s disclosure records sent by courier from one PPSC Agent’s Office to another never arrived at its intended destination. The disclosure material related to a regulatory prosecution involving a company and did contain personal information. The PPSC attempted to notify the individuals whose personal information was compromised, however, the organization was unable to do so.

Since this was an isolated incident and beyond the PPSC’s control, no further review of the organization's security procedures was deemed necessary.

Privacy Impact Assessment

A Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) is a tool which can help an organization meet its privacy responsibilities with regard to the management of personal information. PIAs are initiated when assessing the privacy implications of new or substantially modified programs and activities involving personal information.

During this reporting period, the PPSC did not initiate or complete any Privacy Impact Assessments.

Appendix A – Delegation Order

The Director of Public Prosecutions, pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, hereby designates the persons holding the positions set out in the schedule hereto, or the positions, to exercise the powers and functions of the Director as the head of a government institution.

Schedule

Position Privacy Act and Regulations Access to Information Act and Regulations
Executive Director and Senior Counsel, Ministerial and External Relations Secretariat Full Authority Full Authority
Manager, ATIP, Access to Information and Privacy Office Full Authority Full Authority

Dated, at the City of Ottawa, this 11 day of January, 2010.

Signature of Brian Saunders
Brian Saunders
Director of Public Prosecutions

Appendix B – Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Reporting period: 01-04-2013 to 31-03-2014

Part 1 – Requests under the Privacy Act

  Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 21
Oustanding from previous reporting period 3
Total 24
Closed during reporting period 21
Carried over to next reporting period 3

Part 2 – Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time

Disposition of requests Completion time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Disclosed in part 0 1 5 3 0 0 0 9
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 6
Request abandoned 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 5
Total 9 3 6 3 0 0 0 21

2.2 Exemptions

Section Number of Requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 0
19(1)(b) 0
19(1)(c) 0
19(1)(d) 0
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 0
22(1)(a)(i) 0
22(1)(a)(ii) 0
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 0
22(1)(c) 0
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 0
26 9
27 4
28 0

2.3 Exclusions

Section Number of Requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0

2.4 Format and information released

Disposition Paper Electronic Other Formats
All disclosed 0 1 0
Disclosed in part 5 4 0
Total 5 5 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 229 229 1
Disclosed in part 3216 2209 9
All exempted 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 5
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less than 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 0 0 1 229 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 2 33 4 723 2 828 1 625 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 7 33 5 952 2 828 1 625 0 0
2.5.3 Other Complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal advice sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 1 0 0 0 1
Disclosed in part 4 0 0 0 4
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 0 0 0
Total 5 0 0 0 5

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
3 1 0 0 2
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of days past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 1 0 1
16 to 30 days 0 1 1
31 to 60 days 1 0 1
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 2 1 3

2.7 Requests for translation

Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3 – Disclosures under subsection 8(2)

Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Total
0 0 0

Part 4 – Requests for correction of personal information and notations

  Number
Requests for correction received 0
Requests for correction accepted 0
Requests for correction refused 0
Notations attached 0

Part 5 – Extensions

5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests

Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 15(1)(a) Interference with operations 15(1)(b) Consultation 15(1)(c) Translation or conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 1 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 4 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 5 0 0 0

5.2 Length of extensions

Length of extensions 15(1)(a) Interference with operations 15(1)(b) Consultation 15(1)(c) Translation purposes
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 5 0 0 0
Total 5 0 0 0

Part 6 – Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

6.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations

Consultations Other government institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during reporting period 13 239 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 1 84 0 0
Total 14 323 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 14 323 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0

6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions

Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Disclose in part 7 1 2 0 0 1 0 11
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 10 1 2 0 0 1 0 14

6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations

Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 7 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 0 0
61 to 120 0 0
121 to 180 0 0
181 to 365 0 0
More than 365 0 0
Total 0 0

Part 8 – Resources related to the Privacy Act

8.1 Costs

Expenditures Amount
Salaries $144,720
Overtime $0
Goods and Services $15,591
• Contracts for privacy impact assessments $0  
• Professional services contracts $14,383
• Other $1,208
Total $160,311

8.2 Human Resources

Resources Dedicated full-time Dedicated part-time Total
Full-time employees 1.45 0.01 1.46
Part-time and casual employees 0.00 0.00 0.00
Regional staff 0.00 0.00 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.10 0.00 0.10
Students 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 1.55 0.01 1.56

Appendix A

Previously released ATI package released informally

Institution Number of informal releases of previously released ATI packages
Public Prosecution Service of Canada 2

Completed Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs)

Institution Number of Completed PIAs
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Nil
Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences under the ATIA - Requests with Legal Services
Number of Days Fewer than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed 1001-5000 Pages Processed More than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences under the ATIA - Requests with Privy Council Office
Number of Days Fewer than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed 1001-5000 Pages Processed More than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences under the PA - Requests with Legal Services
Number of Days Fewer than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed 1001-5000 Pages Processed More than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences under the PA - Requests with Privy Council Office
Number of Days Fewer than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed 1001-5000 Pages Processed More than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
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