Departmental Performance Report 2009-2010

Table of Contents

Message from the Attorney General of Canada

Message from the Director of Public Prosecutions

Section I: Overview

Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Section III: Supplementary Information

Message from the Attorney General of Canada

The Honourable Robert Douglas Nicholson

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada is an independent prosecuting authority, responsible for prosecuting offences under federal jurisdiction and for providing high-quality legal advice to investigative agencies. Since its creation in 2006, the PPSC has fulfilled this mandate to an exceptionally high standard, and has been a leader in the criminal justice field.

This Departmental Performance Report, covering the period ending March 31, 2010, describes the PPSC's work on behalf of the Crown and the Attorney General of Canada. The PPSC serves the public through its prosecution of criminal and regulatory offences under federal law in a manner that is fair, impartial, and independent of any improper influence.

The PPSC continues to perform its prosecutorial and advisory roles with integrity and excellence, and has demonstrated its dedication over the past year in the face of a wide range of challenges. I am gratified by the PPSC's continuing contribution to the fight against crime in Canada and to ensuring that our communities are safe places for Canadians to live, raise their families and do business.

 

The Honourable Robert Douglas Nicholson
Attorney General of Canada

Message from the Director of Public Prosecutions

I am pleased to present the 2009-2010 Departmental Performance Report of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada. As a national organization, the PPSC has a mandate to provide prosecutorial services and advice across Canada in a manner that is fair, impartial and objective.

This report demonstrates how the PPSC has performed this function over the past year, while looking forward to the years ahead. It provides an outline, analysis and highlights of the PPSC's activities in areas from drugs to terrorism, war crimes and regulatory offences. We have achieved positive results in the performance of each program activity and are on track to continue delivering our mandate.

Since its creation in 2006, the PPSC has played a key role in the protection of communities across Canada through its work in the criminal justice system. PPSC prosecutors and support staff work tirelessly in their pursuit of this critical role while demonstrating our values of respect, integrity, excellence and leadership.

PPSC staff across Canada perform their duties diligently, with professionalism and pride. I am pleased to note this report shows the results of these continued efforts.

 

Brian Saunders
Director of Public Prosecutions

Section I: Overview

1.1 Summary Information

Mandate

The mandate of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) is set out in the Director of Public Prosecutions ActFootnote 1. The Act calls on the PPSC to provide prosecutorial advice to law enforcement agencies, and to prosecute matters on behalf of the Crown that are within the jurisdiction of the Attorney General of Canada. The PPSC's sole strategic outcome is the independent, impartial and fair prosecution of criminal offences under federal law.

The PPSC plays an integral role in the criminal justice system, promoting due process and working to safeguard the rights of all those who come into contact with the system. The benefits to Canadians from the work carried out by the PPSC include:

The PPSC is a national prosecution service with a network of offices across Canada. As of March 31, 2010, it had 920 employees (representing 823 Full-Time Equivalents), the overwhelming majority of whom were staff prosecutors, paralegals and support staff who assist them. The remainder included other professionals, such as senior managers, administrators and corporate services staff. The PPSC also employs the services of private sector legal agents in locations where it does not have an office or where it is impractical or otherwise not cost-effective for staff counsel to handle cases. The PPSC currently retains some 226 standing agent firms across Canada, representing approximately 590 individually-appointed counsel.

Responsibilities

The PPSC undertakes key duties on behalf of the Attorney General of Canada. These key duties, to be carried out in an objective and non-partisan manner, are:

The PPSC prosecutes cases under federal statutes that are referred to it by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), other federal investigative agencies, provincial police forces and municipal police forces.

The PPSC's prosecution-related work is part of the criminal justice continuum, which includes investigative agencies, law enforcement, courts and other parts of the criminal justice system. Prosecution-related advice during police and other investigations has become crucial to ensure that investigative techniques and procedures are consistent with evolving rules of evidence and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms' protections. The advantage of early prosecutorial advice includes reducing the risk that operational decisions, such as those about methods of obtaining evidence, will detrimentally affect the admissibility of evidence at trial or the constitutional rights of Canadians.

Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

The PPSC has one strategic outcome as illustrated in the following chart, which also presents the PPSC's framework of activities in 2009-10:

Strategic Outcome Chart

1.2 Performance Summary

2009-10 Financial Resources ($ millions)

Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
162.8 181.4 147.0

2009-10 Human Resources (FTEs)

PlannedFootnote 2 Actual Difference
998 823 175

Performance Summary Table

Strategic Outcome: Criminal and regulatory offences under federal law are prosecuted in an independent, impartial and fair manner
Performance Indicators Targets 2009-10 Performance
Number and nature of judicial stays for abuse of process based on the conduct of a federal prosecutor. Zero Zero
Number and percentage of successful malicious prosecution lawsuits. Zero Zero
Number and nature of substantiated complaints regarding the PPSC's independence, impartiality or fairness. Zero Zero

Program Activity 2008-09
Actual
Spending
Footnote 3
2009-10 ($ millions) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Program Activity #1: Drug, Criminal Code, and terrorism prosecution program 89.8 117.1 118.4 127.9 108.1 Social Affairs: A Safe and Secure Canada
Program Activity #2: Regulatory offences and economic crime prosecution program. 15.8 10.7 16.2 19.8 17.8
Program Activity #3: Internal ServicesFootnote 4 26.6 28.2 28.2 33.7 21.1
Total 132.2 156.0 162.8 181.4 147.0

Contribution of Priorities to Strategic Outcome


Operational Priorities Type Status Linkages to Strategic Outcome:

Criminal and regulatory offences under federal law are prosecuted in an independent, impartial and fair manner
1. Prosecuting criminal offences under federal law Ongoing Met All:

The PPSC handled 76,292 prosecution files in 2009-10, independent of any improper influence and in the public interest.
The central element of the PPSC's mandate is to prosecute matters on behalf of the Crown that are within the jurisdiction of the Attorney General of Canada.
2. Providing legal advice to investigative agencies Ongoing Met All:

The PPSC carried out an inaugural survey of investigative agencies in 2008-09 and published the results in 2009-10. Survey respondents were unanimous in confirming the usefulness of PPSC prosecutors’ legal advice on matters of a general nature, as well as on particular investigation files. Respondents repeatedly commented that legal advice can help investigators determine appropriate charges, assess the admissibility of evidence to support those charges, draft judicial authorizations, prepare for and testify in court, and avoid errors that can negatively impact on case outcomes.

The PPSC expects to once again solicit feedback on its services in 2012-13.
Prosecution-related advice is crucial to ensure that investigative techniques and procedures conform with the evolving rules of evidence and the protections found in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The early and ongoing involvement of prosecutors helps ensure that the police and other investigative agencies benefit from legal advice to decide how best to enforce the law. This close collaboration is achieved while maintaining the independence of roles between prosecutors and police and investigative agencies.
3. Contributing to strengthening the criminal justice system Ongoing Met All:

The PPSC continued to participate fully in federal / provincial / territorial forums, and contributed to law enforcement efforts at the international level, thereby addressing criminal justice issues of common interest. It also contributed to improving the efficiency of the criminal justice system by providing legal advice during police investigations (see 2. above), by providing legal training to prosecutors and law enforcement investigators, and, where requested, by providing advice on amendments drafted by the Department of Justice Canada (DOJ) to federal statutes relevant to the criminal justice system.
The PPSC's national and international activities in this area contribute to improving the efficiency of the criminal justice system across Canada.
Management Priorities Type Status Linkages to Strategic Outcome:
1. Performance measurement framework Previously commited to Somewhat Met:

The PPSC continues to pursue improvements to its performance measurement framework. Key performance indicators have been included in the integrated planning process as elements to be considered and monitored in corporate business and human resources plans for the upcoming fiscal year. As of April 2009, the PPSC implemented an improved national protocol governing timekeeping practices. It simplified and restructured various case management data sets for specific activities that relate to prosecutions. The data entry elements for file opening and closing protocols also were simplified and this process is being more closely monitored. In addition, as a result of a significant organizational restructuring, work was done to harmonize the case management system with the new structure. Consequently, work was delayed on the further development of the performance measurement framework.
As a federal government organization, the PPSC is accountable to the Canadian public for how it manages its resources and results achieved.
2. Recruitment and retention Previously committed to Met All:

The PPSC established a working group to move forward the Law Group Project, Ensuring Excellence. The group will work on the development of a career path for prosecutors, which includes enhancing training opportunities and finalizing competency profiles. A Northern recruitment strategy was also launched.
Ensuring that employees feel valued and appreciated, and that the organization is viewed as an employer of choice is essential, particularly given employment alternatives that exist with provincial prosecution services or the private sector.
3. Security Previously committed to Met All:

A Departmental Security Officer was appointed in April 2009 and PPSC-managed security activities such as personnel security and physical security are now in place to facilitate employee security screenings and safeguarding of PPSC offices.
Ensuring the safety and security of employees is of paramount importance. Prosecutors and other employees work in an environment where they may be the subject of threats to their personal safety and security.
4. Knowledge management (KM) Previously committed to Mostly Met:

Progress during 2009-10 included the development of a KM framework, taxonomy and metadata for a number of key knowledge databases.
Effective KM tools contribute to an efficient workforce and to the successful delivery of the PPSC's mandate.

1.3 Risk Analysis

Operational Trends

The PPSC’s total volume of litigation files for 2009-10 reached 76,292, compared to 74,674 litigation files handled in 2008-09. Of this total, 87% were within the drug, Criminal Code and terrorism offences prosecution program, whereas 13% involved the prosecution of federal regulatory offences and economic crime.

A small percentage of highly complex cases absorb a disproportionate share of the PPSC’s total resources. By way of example, drug mega cases and drug cases of high complexity represented 1.33% of the litigation caseload in 2009-10 but approximately 22% of the recorded litigation time of PPSC counsel and paralegals. This shows how a relatively small number of cases, in response to strengthened law enforcement efforts across Canada, may have a disproportionate impact on the demand for prosecutorial resources. A single mega case can absorb more prosecutorial resources than several hundred low complexity cases.

Collaboration with key stakeholders in the criminal justice system is an ongoing and important element of the PPSC’s operating context. Since federal and provincial prosecution services face common issues and challenges, they benefit from collaboration under the leadership of the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (FPT) Heads of Prosecution Committee. The Committee continued its work to promote inter-jurisdictional cooperation and assistance on operational issues such as quality assurance, organized crime prosecutions, concurrent jurisdiction, proceeds of crime, expert witnesses and prosecutor training and security.

External and Internal Influences Facing the PPSC

The PPSC is subject to a variety of external and internal influences, described below.

International crime networks: The globalization of crime networks poses significant dangers to national and global security. These networks are involved in organized crime, engaging in such activities as trafficking in human beings, telemarketing fraud, money laundering, drug trafficking and terrorism. International criminal networks exploit national borders in an attempt to thwart the efforts of authorities in their battle to prevent trans-national crime. This global reality has made it imperative for the PPSC and other organizations to work more effectively with international partners to challenge the serious threats posed by these international criminal networks, to uphold the rule of law, and to enhance safety and security at home and abroad. In 2009-10, the PPSC worked with several international bodies such as the International Association of Prosecutors, the Heads of Prosecuting Agencies Conference, the International Network to Promote the Rule of Law, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the Centro de Estudios de Justicia de las Americas (Chile, Santiago).

The North: Recruitment and retention continue to be a challenge in Canada’s North, particularly in Nunavut and in the Northwest Territories. Crown prosecutors assigned to the North often face the stressful working conditions and pressures associated with, among other things, isolation, cultural differences, lengthy travel and elevated rates of violent crime. Northern prosecutors are required to travel on court circuits and often spend many days away from their homes and families. Prosecutors and Crown Witness Coordinators can also be subject to the effects of vicarious trauma due to the nature of the work they do.

Despite the challenges inherent to the PPSC’s work in the North, this work presents many professional and personal opportunities for growth. Convinced that the opportunities that Northern prosecutions provided were not widely known, the PPSC launched a recruitment strategy in February 2010. This included public notices aimed at attracting candidates to the unique environment that the North represents and the experiences that can be gained from working and living there.

Workload: The PPSC has no control over the number of cases referred to it for prosecution by the police and other investigative agencies that lay charges under federal statutes. Its workload, therefore, is largely based on the decisions of these entities regarding investigative priorities, tactics and allocation of resources. For example, increases in drug enforcement or investigative resources can significantly affect the nature and volume of the PPSC caseload. Similarly, changes in tactics to focus on the upper echelons of organized crime groups rather than on individuals in the lower ranks, affect the complexity and cost of prosecutions.

Resourcing issues: The PPSC is working to ensure that its long-term funding needs are addressed, particularly in the areas of IM/IT and accommodations. In 2009-10, the PPSC assessed the resource gaps related to its capacity to deliver these strategic corporate services. The PPSC may face additional financial pressures resulting from the newly imposed requirements in the arbitral award relating to the Law Group, to compensate for overtime and travel time for some of its lawyers. While facing these issues, the PPSC, like all other government organizations, is subject to the government-wide budget restraint measures announced in Budget 2010 and will be subject to strategic review.

Workforce issues: The entry into force of the first collective agreement and arbitral award for lawyers in the federal public service in 2009-10 presents challenges to managers and employees alike. It has an impact on the way in which managers and employees carry out their day-to-day activities, and the way unionized prosecutors are managed within a collective agreement.

Competition for scarce resources: Some regional offices continued to face recruitment and retention challenges in 2009-10. In certain regions of Canada, the salaries paid to provincial prosecutors exceed those paid to PPSC lawyers. The PPSC will continue to undertake focused recruitment efforts, as well as post-secondary recruitment activities. To ensure that the PPSC remains an employer of choice, it is also introducing a People Management Strategy that delineates the various corporate approaches to be used in support of workforce development.

Security: Due to the nature of their work, PPSC employees may be exposed to incidents of threats and intimidation. Ensuring the safety and security of its employees is a PPSC priority, which includes the use of appropriate security measures, policies and procedures to protect them. In addition, the PPSC is developing a business continuity plan to ensure the continued delivery of its services.

1.4 Expenditure Profile

Voted and Statutory Items

The following table shows the actual spending since the creation of the PPSC:

($ millions)
Vote # or Statutory Item (S) Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording 2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
35 Program expenditures 99.8 120.7 132.6
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 10.1 11.5 14.4
Total 109.9 132.2 147.0

Spending Trend

Authorities Trend

The major variances by fiscal year are as follows:

Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by
Strategic Outcome

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada supports the Attorney General of Canada in the discharge of his criminal law mandate – in particular its work supports the priorities of prosecuting criminal offences under federal law, and contributing to strengthening the criminal justice system. In total, over 250 federal statutes contain offences that fall under the PPSC’s jurisdiction to prosecute. However, the PPSC regularly provides prosecution services and legal advice under only approximately 60 of those statutes.

In all provinces except Quebec and New Brunswick, the PPSC has responsibility for the prosecution of all drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, regardless of whether a federal, provincial, or municipal police agency lays the charges. In Quebec and New Brunswick, the PPSC is responsible for drug charges laid by the RCMP only.

In addition, in all provinces, the PPSC prosecutes violations of federal statutes such as the Fisheries Act, the Income Tax Act, the Excise Act, the Customs Act, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, the Elections Act, the Competition Act and the Canada Shipping Act.

Pursuant to agreements with the provinces, the PPSC also prosecutes Criminal Code offences where drug charges are involved and are the major focus of the case. In the three Territories, the PPSC is responsible for prosecuting all Criminal Code offences.

Hence, the PPSC performs a number of key national roles in fulfilling the criminal litigation responsibilities of the Attorney General of Canada, including:

The following pages describe the PPSC’s three Program Activities and the results achieved during 2009-10.

2.1 Program Activity #1: Drug, Criminal Code and terrorism prosecution program


2009-10 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2009-10 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
118.4 127.9 108.1 684 564 120

Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
Litigation files that are prosecuted are decided on meritFootnote 5 % of all litigation files that are decided on merit (i.e., by most serious outcome) Not applicable Decisions # of files % of total files
Guilty plea 17,814 56.19%
Guilty plea (other/lesser offence) 1,108 3.49%
Conviction 2,441 7.70%
Conviction (other/lesser offence) 89 0.28%
Withdrawal 5,631 17.76%
Stay of proceedings (Crown) 3,679 11.60%
Discharge 295 0.93%
Acquittal 647 2.04%
Total: 31,704 100%
Disposition of cases that are not decided on meritFootnote 6 % of litigation files not decided on merit Not applicable Stay of proceedings (Court) 409 94.46%
Quashed 24 5.54%
Total: 433 100%

Benefits for Canadians

This program activity contributes to ensuring a safe and secure Canada through the prosecution of a broad range of criminal activities. It deals with drug-related offences, complex organized crime cases, terrorism offences as well as war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Performance Analysis

Under this program activity, the PPSC provides prosecution-related adviceFootnote 7 and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecutes all drug charges under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, regardless of whether a federal, provincial or municipal police agency lays the charges, except in the case of Quebec and New Brunswick, where the PPSC prosecutes drug charges laid by the RCMP. Many of these cases involve organized crime. Pursuant to agreements and arrangements with the provinces, the PPSC also prosecutes Criminal Code offences where they are related to drug charges and the drug aspect forms the major part of the case. In the three territories, the PPSC prosecutes all Criminal Code offences. Finally, the PPSC also provides prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations and prosecutes charges relating to war crimes and crimes against humanity and charges pursuant to Part II.1 of the Criminal Code (Terrorism) to combat terrorism.

This program activity also includes the PPSC's Agent Affairs Program, established to enhance the quality of legal services provided by agents and to ensure cost-effective service delivery. It includes a centralized support unit at PPSC headquarters, namely the Agent Affairs Unit, and Agent Supervision Units located in each regional office, which are responsible for the day-to-day management of agents.

Highlights of performance during 2009-10 are as follows:

Lessons Learned

For the prosecution of complex cases, the PPSC follows a mega case policy, included in the Federal Prosecution Service Deskbook, which allows the organization to identify and implement the lessons learned in the management of these cases. These include the early involvement of prosecutors, the preparation of a prosecution plan at an early stage, and the review of each mega case prosecution plan by the PPSC’s Major Case Advisory Committee (formerly known as the National Prosecution Advisory Committee).

Crown Witness Coordinators (CWC) are employed by the PPSC in its Northern offices. The coordinators help explain to victims and witnesses how the court process works and support them during their involvement with the criminal justice system. CWCs assist the truth seeking function of the courts by encouraging them to come forward with their evidence in what are often extremely stressful circumstances. In 2009-10, the PPSC partnered with the Policy Centre for Victim Issues of the DOJ to hire a Northern Victim Services Coordinator (NVSC) to support and enhance Crown Witness Coordination Services in the three Northern territories. The NVSC is based in Ottawa at PPSC Headquarters and provides liaison, coordination, program development and advisory services to the regional offices in the North.

The PPSC is part of a community of prosecution services in Canada. It is an active participant in the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Heads of Prosecution Committee, and with the assistance of provincial prosecution officials, shares information, precedents, best practices and the outcome of discussions among prosecutors and police, relating to organized crime prosecutions. Such cooperation is essential to ensuring that all prosecutions are undertaken to the highest standard.

In the Agent Affairs Program, a comprehensive review of the Prosecution Code Set (PCS) used by agents to record their time in their accounts was carried out in consultation with counsel both internally and with the agent community. As a result, the PCS was simplified, thereby reducing the administrative burden and increasing transparency.

2.2 Program Activity #2: Regulatory offences and
economic crime prosecution program


2009-10 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2009-10 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
16.2 19.8 17.8 160 148 12

Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
Litigation files that are prosecuted are decided on merit % of all litigation files that are decided on merit (i.e., by most serious outcome) Not applicable Decisions # of files % of total files
Guilty plea 1,324 58.48%
Guilty plea (other/lesser offence) 7 0.31%
Conviction 377 16.65%
Conviction (other/lesser offence) 1 0.04%
Withdrawal 155 6.85%
Stay of proceedings (Crown) 140 6.18%
Discharge 223 9.85%
Acquittal 37 1.63%
Total: 2,264 100%
Disposition of cases that are not decided on merit % of litigation files not decided on merit Not applicable Stay of proceedings (Court) 18 85.71%
Quashed 3 14.29%
Total: 21 100%

Benefits for Canadians

This program activity contributes to protecting the health, safety and general welfare of Canadians through the prosecution of offences that regulate individual and corporate conduct. It also contributes to maintaining a secure, fair marketplace by enhancing compliance with and enforcement of marketplace rules and regulations.

Performance Analysis

Under this program activity, the PPSC provides prosecution-related advice and litigation support to federal investigative agencies, and prosecutes all non-drug cases under approximately 60 federal statutes, including regulatory offences and economic crimes. Examples include offences under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, the Income Tax Act, the Competition Act, the Fisheries Act and the Canada Elections Act, as well as offences under the Customs Act, the Excise Act and the Excise Tax Act.

Specialized teams are dedicated to prosecutions where a specialized knowledge of legislation is required. By way of example, several PPSC offices have teams of prosecutors dedicated to economic crimes prosecutions, and the Atlantic Regional Office has a team of counsel devoted full time to regulatory prosecutions, with fisheries offences accounting for up to 75% of the workload.

PPSC legal advisors also provide advice on and prosecute complex capital market fraud cases as part of the RCMP’s Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMETs) that investigate suspected capital market fraud offences. Where provincial Attorneys General decline to prosecute, the PPSC may prosecute cases referred by the IMETs.

As well, a group of PPSC prosecutors provides services in highly specialized areas under statutes that are the responsibility of the Commissioner of Competition.

The Supreme Court of Canada Coordinator is responsible for the coordination of the PPSC’s litigation in the Supreme Court. This involves reviewing all documents to be filed by PPSC prosecutors as well as coordinating their internal review; providing logistical support for the preparation, service and filing of the documents; and acting as the PPSC’s Ottawa agent.

The PPSC is also responsible for recovering outstanding fines related to various federal offences.

Highlights of performance during 2009-10 are as follows:

Lessons Learned

In September 2009, the PPSC completed its response to an assignment issued by the Attorney General to the Director of Public Prosecutions in 2007 to develop best practices for prosecuting fraud involving governments, based on an examination of the strategies used in other jurisdictions within Canada and abroad. The proposed best practices deal with detection, intervention and education in the area of frauds against governments, prosecutorial involvement in investigations and in the conduct of prosecutions, and performance measures. They are available on the PPSC’s website at http://www.ppsc-sppc.gc.ca/eng/pub/pbp-mep/index.html.

Since 2008, the PPSC and CRA, acknowledging the importance of ongoing communication and liaison, renewed a memorandum of understanding regarding investigations and prosecutions in fiscal matters. Representatives of the two organizations met several times during 2009-10 to discuss issues of mutual interest, including joint planning, training and specific issues arising from revenue investigations and prosecutions. In April 2009, the CRA and the PPSC held their annual conference of investigators and prosecutors to further enhance cooperation between the two organizations.

In 2009-10, the PPSC continued its ongoing commitment to implement the recommendations of the Le Pan reportFootnote 8 on improving the IMET program. For example, PPSC advisors participated in a timeliness and benchmarking study to develop timelines for investigations and prosecutions. The PPSC was also involved in an evaluation of the IMET program led by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, which was completed in March 2010.

2.3 Program Activity #3: Internal Services


2009-10 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2009-10 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
28.2 33.7 21.1 154 111 43

Performance Analysis

Internal Services comprise groups of related activities that are administered to support the needs of the above two program activities and other corporate obligations. For the first time, the PPSC participated in the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Management Accountability Framework assessment process in 2009-10 (MAF Round VII). The assessment pointed to several areas of management that presented some opportunities for improvement. The required improvements generally reflected the fact that the PPSC, as a new organization, is still building capacity in management processes and structures.

Highlights of performance during 2009-10 are as follows:

Section III: Supplementary Information

3.1 Financial Highlights

The financial highlights presented within this DPR are intended to serve as a general overview of the PPSC’s financial position and operations. The PPSC’s financial statements are available on its website at: http://www.ppsc-sppc.gc.ca/eng/pub/index.html

($ thousands)
Condensed Statement of Financial Position
as at March 31, 2010
% Change 2008-09 2009-10
Total Assets -11 % 11,420 10,205
Total Liabilities 6% 38,552 40,993
Total Equity 13% - 27,132 - 30,788
Total -11% 11,420 10,205

($ thousands)
Condensed Statement of Operations for
the year ended March 31, 2010
% Change 2008-09 2009-10
Total Expenses 12% 155,771 174,024
Total Revenues 5% 12,529 13,157
Net Cost of Operations 12% 143,242 160,867

 

Assets by Type
Total assets were $10.2 million at the end of 2009-10, a decrease of $1.2 million over the previous year’s assets of $11.4 million. Receivables and tangible capital assets represented the bulk of the PPSC’s assets.


Revenues
Total revenues increased by 5% from 2008-09. All the revenues stemmed from the recovery of costs from federal investigative agencies for legal advice and litigation support and the prosecution of federal offences to protect the environment, natural resources, as well as economic and social health.


Liabilities by Type
Total liabilities were $41 million at the end of 2009-10, an increase of $2.4 million over the previous year’s liabilities of $38.6 million. Accounts payable, accrued liabilities and employee severance benefits represented most of the PPSC’s liabilities.


Expenses
Total expenses for the PPSC were $174.0 millionFootnote 9 in 2009-10, which increased by 12% over the previous year. The majority of funds, $115.5 million or 66%, were spent in the prosecution of drug, organized crime and Criminal Code offences and included the increase in agent fee rates. The expenses in this area increased by 17% over 2008-09.

3.2 List of Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2009–10 DPR can be found on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s website at
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/dpr-rmr/2009-2010/index-eng.asp.

Horizontal Initiatives, including the following:

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

3.3 Other Items of Interest

The following PPSC publications can be found at: http://www.ppsc-sppc.gc.ca/eng/pub/index.html

Date modified: